Thursday, 12 March 2009

Jacob's Ladder

I'm looking at the double helix at the core of our donut. The fluid of the aether is moving around the cylinder in the shape of a double helix. One helix travels down the cylinder while the other helix travels up. We have two forces working in opposition to one another other. What's going to be the rub?

The double helix moves up and down the latitudes. So far, I've summised this is the magnetic field. I'm looking for the electric field which is longitudinal. It is perpendicular to the magnetic field. It appears, I could well find the electric field as something which emerges between the two helices of the double helix. An obvious comparison at this stage is the double helix of DNA.

If we imagine the structure of a double helix as somewhat like a ladder, then DNA has base pairs forming the ladder's rungs, and the sugar and phosphate molecules forming the vertical sidepieces of the ladder. It's the rungs, or base pairs which follow the longitudinal axis. A base pair is made up of two complementary, nitrogen rich molecules held together by weak chemical bonds. Two strands of DNA are held together in the shape of a double helix by the bonds between their base pairs. These bonds are formed by hydrogen.

Without hydrogen bonds there could be no life because they hold the double helix of DNA together and this they do by charge attractions. Hydrogen bonds stabilise the structure of proteins and are essential for catalysis. Hydrogen bonds occupy an important role in the core structure of DNA. What role, if any, does hydrogen play in the core of our EMR torus?

Many thanks:

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